Features

June 03, 2013, 8:30am

Art of Darkness: Nathan Danilowicz

Tucked away in a former dental office and Rastafari community center between West Adams and Culver City, artist Nathan Danilowicz has been busy.  The rooms of his studio space seem like dark altars in reverence to forces both ancient and modern, where the conceptual strategies of painterly abstraction are reclaimed as the spells and invocations of a lost age.  These tattered, rune-inscribed veils are the latest product of Nathan's inquiry into how sci-fi shamanism, ritual, and the occult share more than just superficial affinity with many of the modalities and practices of modern and contemporary painting.  These new works along with some others will be exhibited later in June at

Listed under: Features

May 16, 2013, 8:30am

Painting, You’re Doing It Wrong

Don’t bother asking Mark Gottsegen – founder of AMIEN, author of The Painter’s Handbook, teacher, artist, and all around art materials guru – what’s the best type of paint to use?  “I get asked this all the time,” said Gottsegen, who took time out from writing to speak to me last week.  “And I say, well, I can’t tell you that.”

1_NAP_Spaulding

Listed under: Features

May 08, 2013, 8:30am

Painting as Shorthand: the lawn chair sculptures of Patrick McDonough

Patrick McDonough’s lawn chairs are not meant for sitting. And if they begin to seem functional, well, it’s all pretend. The sculptures offer the formal concepts of lawn chairs without actually closing the deal -- legs and armrests have gone missing, for starters, and the works themselves are decidedly non functional. Instead of functionality McDonough is interested in their allusions to an American iconography of leisure. Take a look at them and it’s not difficult to imagine the smell of freshly cut grass or the skyward boom of summertime fireworks. It’s part of what the artist describes as his overarching interest in the aesthetics of free time.

Listed under: Features

February 22, 2013, 11:30am

MAKING [in] DALLAS

I’m not gonna say that Dallas has a “burgeoning art scene.” It’s been here and it’s full of artists who are not tied to a specific idea of what it is like to exist in a cultural mecca. There is a shit ton of space: warehouses are being flipped into DIY studios, abandoned buildings are being utilized for performances and pop up group shows and there is a re-introduction of artist run galleries and raw experimental spaces. Top notch venues such as Dallas’ Power Station and Forth Worth Contemporary Arts are bringing in international artists and sparking much needed conversations as well.

Listed under: Dallas, Features

February 01, 2013, 8:30am

NAP Contributor Tribute

In case you haven't noticed, we have the best art writers in the world. Seriously, it's true. Our blog contributors are stationed all over the country, scoping out shows, visiting studios, and interviewing the best contemporary painters in the art world. Recently we asked our most prolific bloggers to answer a few questions about themselves and their thoughts on 2012. It's your chance to get to know a handful of the talented individuals that bring you the New American Paintings/Blog! There are many more writers, and we hope to feature them soon.

Thanks to everyone that contributes to our blog, helping us bring our readers rich and exciting content on a daily basis!

Listed under: Features

August 07, 2012, 8:30am

Ten Must See Painting Shows: Summer 2012

Originally Posted on the Huffington Post by New American Paintings Publisher/Editor, Steven Zevitas

The heat has been turned way up on the East Coast, which is all the more reason to duck into a few galleries as you trudge through the city. As is typical for the summer months, a lot of galleries have mounted ambitious group exhibitions, many of which focus on painting.

Listed under: Art World, Features

June 29, 2012, 8:15am

40 Galleries You Should Know if You Love Paint

It is a simple truth that in any given month, if you added up all of the available space in commercial galleries around the country, the amount dedicated to painting would dwarf that of all other media. The list that I have compiled consists of 40 United States’ based galleries that have a proclivity for painting. That is not to say that painting is the only medium that these galleries show; indeed, most represent artists producing work in a range of media. All of them, however, have shown a particular interest in the medium over an extended period of time, and all have stables of artists that are at least 50% painters.

Listed under: Art Market, Art World, Features
Tagged as: Aaron Parazette, ACME, Adam Sorensen, Ala Ebtekar, Alexis Stamatiou, Ali Smith, Allison Schulnik, American Contemporary, Andrew Guenther, Andrew Schoultz, Angela Dufresne, Angela Fraleigh, Angles Gallery, Anna Conway, Anthony Meier Fine Arts, Ben Snead, Ben Weiner, Benjamin Degen, Brett Reichman, Brian Zink, CANADA, Carlos Vega, Cary Smith, Catherine Kehoe, Corbett vs. Dempsey, CRG Gallery, Daniel Heidkamp, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Daniela Rivera, Danielle Tegeder, David Kordansky Gallery, Devening Projects + Editions, Dimitri Kozyrev, Domingo Barreres, Don Voisine, Echo Eggebrecht, Elaine Spatz-Rabinowitz, Eleven Rivington, Emily Eveleth, Erik Den Breejen, Feature Inc., Feodor Voronov, Franklin Evans, Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Freight + Volume Gallery, Friedrich Petzel Gallery, Gregory Lind Gallery, Hannah Barrett, Harris Lieberman Gallery, Heyd Fontenot, Holly Coulis, Horton Gallery, Howard Yezerksi Gallery, Inman Gallery, International Art Objects Galleries, Jack Balas, Jake Longstreth, James Fuentes, James Gobel, James Harris Gallery, James Kelly Contemporary, James Siena, Jeff Bailey Gallery, Jered Sprecher, Jill Moser, Jim Gaylord, Joe Wardwell, John Sparagana, John Zurier, Jon Rappleye, Joshua Abelow, Jovi Schnell, Judie Bamber, Karla Wozniak, Kate Shepherd, Katherine Sherwood, Kelly McLane, Kent Dorn, Kiel Johnson, Kirk Hayes, Kristen Schiele, LaMontagne Gallery, Laurel Sparks, Leo Koenig Inc., Libby Black, Lisa Cooley, Lisa Sanditz, Liz Markus, Louise Belcourt, Mark Flood, Mark Moore Gallery, Marx & Zavattero, Matthew McClune, Melora Kuhn, Michael Scoggins, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, Morgan Bulkeley, Nina Bovasso, Nuno de Campos, Paolo Arao, Patrick Wilson, Paul Shakespear, Paule Anglim, Pierogi, Robert Buck, Robert Kelly, Ryan Mrozowski, Sarah Awad, Sarah Cain, Sarah Walker, Shane Campbell Gallery, Shara Hughes, Shaun O’Dell, Sigrid Sandström, Sikkema Jenkins & Co, Siobhan Liddell, Steven Zevitas, Stuart Arends, Sue Scott Gallery, Susan Jane Belton, Susan Vielmetter Los Angeles Art Projects, Texas Gallery, Tim Bavington, Tommy Fitzpatrick, Wendy White, William Cordova, William Swanson, Xiaoze Xie, Yoon Lee, Zach Feuer, Zieher Smith

June 25, 2012, 8:15am

Abstraction in the Forecast; Gabriel Pionkowski at New Yorks Galerie Lelong

New American Paintings can work in mysterious ways. When Lisa Freiman, Senior Curator and Chair of the Department of Contemporary Art at the Indianapolis Museum if Art, completed the jurying of our 2012 Midwest Competition, the results of which will be published in August as Issue #102, we had a discussion about the overwhelming amount of abstraction in the applicant pool; indeed, the book will strongly reflect this.

Listed under: Art World, Features

June 15, 2012, 8:25am

Revisiting NAP Issue #1

At the very least, our design teams have come a long way! The content, however, although receiving face-lifts every so often, has been the same. We have featured artists from all over the country in our magazine achieving greater exposure for their work. As it states in the first publisher's note, "...this publication can act as an open studio for artists across an entire region, whether they work in close proximity to other artists or work alone in the woods...This book represents the launching of a new idea in art publishing, a new opportunity for emerging artists, and a new market for collectors."

Listed under: Features

October 20, 2011, 9:00am

Progress Report: Q&A with Kris Chatterson and Vince Contarino

Give it time and the Internet will mobilize for change in just about any arena. So it’s not surprising that artist-run exhibition spaces -- always bastions of change -- are increasingly striving for a stronger online presence, sometimes even eschewing fixed brick-and-mortar locales all together. And it’s not just exhibition spaces.

Listed under: DC, Features, Q&A

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